Troubled playmaker Brett Seymour has vowed to rebuild his life and NRL career in Auckland after signing with the Warriors as legend Stacey Jones' successor.

The Warriors have taken a gamble on Seymour, who was sacked by Cronulla in July after several alcohol-related off-field incidents.

A recent NRL policy development stipulated that clubs which took on players with a history of bad behaviour would be held accountable if there were further incidents which brought the game into disrepute.

Seymour, Warriors chief executive Wayne Scurrah and the club's executive director of football John Hart met with NRL chief executive David Gallop on Friday before formalising the contract.

And veteran Seymour says he realises he's on his last chance at his third club and can't afford to slip up.

"I regret some of the things that have happened in the past but I am desperate to play first grade football again and I want to do everything possible to rebuild my life," Seymour said.

"I don't want to let them down or let myself down. I know I have to make this work."

The Warriors badly needed a quality halfback to take over next season, with Jones last week announcing this would be his last year in the game.

They have given Seymour a one-year deal with an option to extend another year.

Scurrah admitted the 24-year-old's behaviour would be strictly monitored as he seeks to rebuild his first grade career one last time.

"After taking a lot of factors into account, we're pleased we've been able to put together a contract to bring Brett to the Warriors and we're thankful for the NRL's full support in what we are trying to achieve," Scurrah said.

"In his time with Brisbane and Cronulla, Brett has proven himself as a high-quality half. We were interested in him 18 months ago and it's well-known that we have been in the market for a playmaker for some time.

"At the same time, there are some well-documented issues surrounding Brett which we have been discussing with him in putting together a program to help him turn his life around.

"We accept the NRL has a hard-line policy on clubs being held accountable for signing players with previous behaviour issues of this type.

"Brett knows this is his final chance to make something of his career and his life and together we will be doing all we can to make it work."