Indigenous All Stars representatives Kierran Moseley and Jenni-Sue Hoepper at the Indigenous Leaders Dinner this week.

Moseley's All Stars heartache

When Kierran Moseley is sent onto the field by Indigenous All Stars coach Laurie Daley on Friday night expect the Titans hooker to look up to the heavens rather than into the stands.

While many of his teammates will have family spread throughout the crowd at Cbus Super Stadium, those closest to Moseley will be watching the game from North Queensland as his mother helps to care for his ailing grandfather.

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Janelle Major was a single mother raising two boys and two girls in Cloncurry in north-west Queensland when Moseley made the move to Townsville 770 kilometres to the east to finish his schooling and pursue his rugby league dream.

Overlooked by the Cowboys after graduating from Kirwan High School, Moseley linked with Penrith in 2013 and despite bouts of homesickness that grew so strong one night he started packing his bags, it was the phone calls to family and friends that saw him through.

His grandfather, Kevin Major, made the journey to Sydney with Janelle to watch Moseley make his NRL debut against the Sea Eagles at Brookvale Oval in Round 25 last year but his grandmother, Ellen Major, was too ill to make the trip.

Ellen passed away in late 2014 and Kevin is currently undergoing chemotherapy in Townsville and Moseley says they, along with his mother, will be foremost in his mind when he gets to represent the Indigenous All Stars.

"My grandma passed away recently so I'll be doing it for her and also my mum in what she's done for me and also my family over time," Moseley told NRL.com.

"For my grandfather also, I'm real close with him and he's in Townsville at the moment having chemo so he won't be able to come down.

"I'll be doing it for him as well because he'd love to be there. My uncle and that went to the very first [All Stars game] but now that he's in Townsville I think they're just trying to save up a bit of money to go up and see him. I'll be doing it for them.

"Last year when I made my debut my mum and grandad flew down so it was pretty good for my grandma to see that while she was still with us."

A town of less than 3,000 people, Moseley recognised after his older brother Corey graduated from Cloncurry High School that "the 'Curry" was not where his rugby league dreams would be fulfilled.

In 2010 he moved to Townsville and lived with inaugural Cowboys coach Grant Bell as he completed his studies and continued to develop his game at Kirwan High under the tutelage of coach Dave Akers.

Now exciting those at the Titans with the dynamic nature of his game in and around dummy-half, Moseley said the desire to make his family proud kept him on the right path when others around him were being distracted by outside influences.

"I just played footy back there and I knew if I wanted to play NRL that staying there wasn't going to be the best opportunity for myself if I wanted to achieve that dream," the 20-year-old said.

"They all saw me as moving away from home to try and achieve something so that drove me a lot and also my mum. She was a single mother trying to look after me and my brother and my two little sisters and that also drove me as well.

"In Cloncurry you're the big fish in the fish tank and then moving to Townsville you're the small one in the big fish tank. I just knew I was there to try and achieve something that I wanted to do so I didn't let anyone get in my way.

"Coming up through school and that I didn't make any of the Queensland teams so for me, when my mates and other boys were out drinking and hanging out with girls and that, I knew that if I wanted to do rugby league they weren't the right mates to be around and didn't want to achieve what I wanted to achieve."