Victor Radley got around in his playing kit. Cooper Cronk got asked for one more year.

Even Russell Crowe, literally, received a shout-out from the Roosters faithful. A sincere "thank you, Russell" for pushing Luke Keary across Anzac Parade.

Every red, white and blue fan that waited got a handshake, autograph, or celebratory selfie with the true man of the moment.

Trent Robinson – who in turn received the highest praise of all.

"You look at what's happened over these last seven years, the way he's going he will probably go down as 'The Super Coach'," Roosters chairman Nick Politis told NRL.com.

Politis is no sentimentalist, nor revisionist. He knows as well as anyone Gibson's standing in the game, well beyond the five titles at two clubs in 10 seasons.

As Politis gave his two cents down the line, Robinson did the rounds of 1000-odd Roosters fans.

For 90 minutes after his team departed the club's post-grand final celebrations, for even more celebrations, the coach pressed the flesh of an oft-mocked fan base.

"He's still down there at HQ is he? That doesn't surprise at all," Politis said.

"That's the big picture Trent is thinking about there. It's not just about winning.

"Last night at the club they all got on the roof and he gave one hell of a speech. He spoke about the pride he has in the red, white and blue and it brought the house down.

"He's just brilliant, the way he goes about things and keeps going.

"He covers both sides of it. He started his coaching career in France and learnt to coach in French. He's incredibly intelligent and driven, but is still able to relate to his players and has the ability to get through to them.

"He's so respected by the players and the fans. He's just such a unique person."

Robinson rubs some the wrong way. More so than ever in 2019 with his cagey team selections and being a perceived high horse among rival coaches.

It's hard not to respect the bloke as he worked his way patiently through the throng of Roosters fans though, tired eyes, his tired kids and tired club officials watching as he thanked every, last, one with seemingly tireless energy.

"I get [as] a full-time job, to coach rugby league," Robinson explained simply.

"These people are the reason that I get to do that.

"They come out in the colours, they come out and support us each week. They buy the merchandise, they buy the memberships, they do everything for us.

"We don't get the opportunity that much to say thank you and if you're going to turn up today, I'm going to say thank you."

With yet another premiership in their keeping, the Roosters love-in was small but resounding on Monday morning.

Bradley "The Coach Whisperer" Stubbs was among them, sporting a bit of premiership bling.

Veteran forward Mitchell Aubusson took the stage in a leg brace, scans on MCL damage in his knee on hold for another day or so yet.

His latest grand final experience, all 13 minutes on the paddock, with another 67 of hobbled agony and ecstasy?

"My worst nightmare, with a really happy dream at the end," Aubusson told the fans.

Cronk will also be "down at Bondi Beach for the next month" if anyone wants to grab a beer.

Coaching legend Jack Gibson.
Coaching legend Jack Gibson. ©NRL Photos

Radley might have taken his boots off by then. Maybe.

Anything else, Robbo?

"Probably the most apt text that I got over the night and it came from the great Joey Barton," he grinned.

Joey Barton of 15 years in the English Premier League fame, infamous for endless controversy along the way.

"He's got into coaching now and I've done some coaching stuff," Robinson said.

"He's really passionate, he loves his league and he loves the character in league.

"And he was pretty apt about the way we won. To win on principles, if you've got to go to the depth of your principles to win a game then you know you're in a good position."

Robinson now has three premierships in seven seasons. As Politis points out, that's when you know you're in a good position.