Robbo sizes up Kili, then historic World Club Challenge height

Trent Robinson still spent parts of grand final week slogging away in an altitude chamber as he prepares to summit Mt Kilimanjaro, before eyeing off another unprecedented height in rugby league.

Robinson will depart for Tanzania next Tuesday, where he will trek 5895 metres up the world's tallest free-standing mountain as the Mark Hughes Foundation tackles a $600,000 donation target for brain cancer.

Just a day after the Roosters' second straight grand final win, Robinson's attention was already turning to Mt Kilimanjaro and then the Tricolours' next assignment – another crack at history in the 2020 World Club Challenge.

The Roosters currently sit equal with Wigan having won the title four times, including its first edition at the SCG in 1976.

Next February's clash with the winner of Saturday's Super League grand final – between Salford and St Helens – will give the Roosters a chance at a fifth Club Challenge victory and becoming the most successful outfit in the concept's victory.

Robinson's side travelled to Wigan last year via France with a moving visit to The Somme, but the all-conquering coach said he and the club may push for next year's match to return to Sydney for the first time since 2014.

"Usually [the World Club Challenge] gets sorted very quickly, that's what usually happens," Robinson said on Monday.

"But we've got to find out whether it's St Helens or Salford and then we'll move within a couple of weeks to know what our decision is.

"I really enjoyed the trip and the journey going on last year's one, but it's whether it deserves to be in Sydney for an opportunity as well. It's up for the two clubs to decide."

First up though is the week-long Kilimanjaro trek alongside the likes of Hughes, Danny Buderus and Michael Gordon in a 20-strong hiking party.

All proceeds from the Foundation's latest venture will go towards a new Brain Care Coordinator position to cover the NSW mid-north coast.

Robinson has trekking experience from his formative coaching years in France, and has scaled the 4208 metres of the country's second-highest peak, Grandes Jorasses.

But with Kilimanjaro boasting another vertical mile on his best effort, Robinson has spent the past four months preparing his body for an atmosphere he has never experienced.

"I've been doing altitude training four times a week over at Concord," Robinson said.

"I've been doing it for four months. It's hard to switch. I'd say I might give myself today [Monday] but from tomorrow...

"I'm really looking forward to it. We've raised a lot of money and it goes to nurses to assist brain cancer patients. It's a great cause and I think we can see that from the Beanies for Brain Cancer round. I wanted a challenge and to help Mark.

"I've been over 4000m, the second highest in France I've climbed. I haven't been over 5000. That's high. It's a real test.

"I'm not concerned about the days walking, I've done enough of that. It's more about the altitude and making sure I'm prepared for that."