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Kahu tight-lipped about possible move to Cowboys

Jordan Kahu was reluctant to delve into speculation over his future before returning to Brisbane, but the Broncos outside back admitted he "had some phone calls to make".

Kahu has been heavily linked with a move to North Queensland as Ben Barba's immediate replacement.

NRL.com understands both the Cowboys and Broncos are willing to explore the potential of Kahu heading to Townsville, but the man himself asked to be kept out of discussions until after Friday night’s All Stars clash in Melbourne.

“There's a lot of speculation this week but I was just trying to focus on the Maori game," Kahu told NRL.com.

"I fly back to Brisbane [on Saturday] so I will go back and sort it all out then. To be honest I've honestly put everything off until I get back to Brisbane.

"I didn't want to do anything. I knew that if I had anything else on my mind in camp my head would be elsewhere. I wanted to fully focus on the Maori team. I think I did that."

Kahu isn’t guaranteed a spot in the Broncos' strongest 17, but a move to the Cowboys would see him slot straight into the No.1 jersey originally meant for Barba.

Broncos winger Jordan Kahu.
Broncos winger Jordan Kahu. ©NRL Photos

Kahu can play multiple positions in the back-line and if the Cowboys somehow manage to lure Valentine Holmes back to the NRL, then Kahu can easily move into another position.

The New Zealand Maori back wasn’t willing to divulge too much information in the aftermath of his side's 34-14 loss at AAMI Park but admitted there were plenty of discussions to be had in the coming days.

"I guess I'll just get on the bus and make a few phone calls on my way back to Brisbane," he said.

"We'll see what happens after that."

Kahu admitted Friday's match had a different feel to it than a Test match against Australia.

"It was a bit weird because normally if I'm playing for the Kiwis against Australia we have that real hatred for each other but this week was a bit weird, where we kind of respected each other and looked at each other like brother," Kahu said.

"Our ancestors and people before had similar battles, and the mutual respect between both cultures was pretty special."